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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> the other point to make is the cardinals who weren't appointed by benedict were appointed by john paul 2 rrp. so i think they're all of like mind. tt sense papal elections are unlike the iowa caucuses where you have debate. that won't happen. it's more about style and tone than they are about substance. so i don't think you'll get a new pope who will repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage. but you could get a pope who uses the post modern world a little more and put a more positive face to the message. >> i want to go to ben we'der man. are the crowds saying anything now? >> people are very much waiting to see and to hear from pope benedict. now, the the italian authorities said they were expecting up to 200,000 people to come today and we know that even in some italian schools, the children have been told if they're an september today, they will not be penalized. in order to accommodate the large crowd that's expected, he's doing it outside. people from all over the world here. we're joined actually by one guest, kevin, from washington, d.c., who is visiting rome. your thoughts
. although, many of us remember the pictures of john paul -- pope john paul ii who was extremely old and ill when he died. the supposition here is that pope benedict doesn't want to see himself in the same position we saw pope john paul ii. there may be some reasons regarding pope benedict's health that we are aware of at this time. but certainly we have seen it pulled benedick grow increasingly tired -- pope benedick xvi grow increasingly tired. we have seen him use a way of moving up the basilica of a moving platform because he was too tired during those ceremonies to actually walk down the i yelled up to the altar. -- down the aise up to the altar. these all decisions that were taken not to tire the pope particularly over christmas. which is one of the busiest times in the pope's schedule. easter is coming up and that is also a very busy time for pope benedict. he has obviously decided this is too much of a heavy schedule for him. and he will in fact resign, as a said, on february 28. it remains to be seen what may happen after that and who will be pulled for the very important easter hol
different from john paul ii who was this media savvy loved pope that loved to come out and do big speech and address the big crowds so the pope is kind of going away and stepping aside in a very low key manner as he leaves the whole of his upon tir kate. shocking but not unexpected hinting in the past that a pope is -- if he doesn't feel the strength to carry on, he should resign or abdicate in this case. >> thank you very much. here with now contributor father robert barren. can you put the benedict papacy in to context? pope john paul ii, massive. this one's different. what's the legacy in your mind? >> well, i think he sees the papacy very much in continuity of john paul ii. they were both men of the council. they were at vatican 2 and contributed and i think both saw an attempt to interpret vatican 2 properly. i would say that's the major contribution of pope benedict. he wanted to read vatican 2 as a an evangelical council, a council to get the message of the faith out to the wider world and i think in koont knewty with john paul and that's probably the major legacy. >> father, this
were saying before that john paul ii for have should have done that to save themselves all of the pain but he very much felt that his was an office that lived and died with him at that point. clearly pope benedict xvi feels it is better to hand it over to someone, given the size of the job at how much response ability it is. >> let's turn to the bbc's tom burridge for madrid. the reaction there. >> no official reaction yet but we did get through to a priest in the local parish in madrid that expressed the surprise, a complete shock, i guess, over the decision saying he has not spoken to any colleagues, friends and religious circles who has heard any rumors that the pope was thinking of stepping down. this is a country pope benedict xv has visited three times and collected. 2006, he went to valencia. 2010, santiago and in barcelona. and then the following year he came to the capital, madrid. he was quite critical, interestingly, in the visit to barcelona. the policies toward the church -- prime minister zapatero. he legalized gay marriage and relaxed abortion laws and the pope on that i
the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the people who met the pope said that he was shy and charming. his most important writings dealt with things such as the importance of love. >> he is the most intelligent, intelligent,pope we have had in years. his sermons and harmonies are beautiful. >> he warned that excluding christianity from national debate could be harmful for democracy. by the time pope benedict came to westminster cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. he has faced criticism over the handling of the sexual abuse crisis. he has been accused of doing too little to prevent abuse by priests. >> there is a suspicion that they were being shielded by j.p. ii rather than by him. >> he hoped he could build up a struggle church, but in seven years, there was little that he could do.
, that has pope john paul ii blesses want faithful from his window. for the first time since announcing his resignation. a crowd of 50,000 fill would st. peter's square 11 days before the pope is stepping down. meanwhile the cardinals are areiching in rome to lobby for the next pope of the church. pastor of our lady. monsingor always good to see you. >> good to be with you, too. >> what direction will the church go and who will the cardinals pick? >> i think we have a couplele of issuings facing us. the need for a strong organizational leadership in rome. between the aging of john paul ii and a pope in the late cents and 80s and admits he's slowing down, a lot has been let g. we need a strong letter in rome and be directive . someone with john paul roim two's charis mareach out to the third world and europe and america where we have lost many, many catholics. i hope we have someone with a new vibrant vision and someone from the third world who puts us in church with want major i wanty of catholics in central and south america. >> there is it a discussion that the new pontiff could be from a
contrast to that of pope john paul ii, his immediate predecessor, who served 27 years, the second longest of any pope. during that tenure, john paul was shot by a would-be assassin and later contracted parkinson's disease. in his last years he struggled to walk, speak, and even listen until his death in 2005. days later, white smoke arose from the chimney of the sistine chapel to signal cardinal joseph ratzinger election. he was at 78 the oldest pope elected in nearly 300 years. the future benedict xvi was born in germany in 1927, an archbishop of munich and then cardinal. for nearly three decades he was one of pope john paul's most trusted aides enforcing conservative doctrine. as pope he warned against growing secularism in the west. it was not always a popular stance in europe and north america as evidenced today. >> the next pope we need somebody who will modernize the church somewhat and move with the times so that they don't lose their audience and all the younger people. >> hopefully the next pope will be eventually a little bit better and more inclusive than this one was. >> suare
, john paul ii, his predecessor was 85 and he could barely walk and speak. he was mumbling and he still didn't resign. and so, a pope has not resigned for 700 years, and so nobody expected really this to happen. and this to happen so soon. out of the blue, without any indications that he would make such a drastic announcement that, that came as a shock to pretty much everybody. he made the announcement in a small congregation of cardinals here in the vatican just behind me, and certainly didn't make a big speech or announcement about it meaning that even as you mentioned the spokesperson was not aware and the closest aides with were not aware so that means that the pope has made a long and thoughtful consideration of his strength and he just decided that he does not have it anymore and he wants somebody else to take his place as the leader of the world's catholics. >> all right. claudio lavanya and i know that you have a busy day and month ahead of you and even busier than you thought it would be. claudio, he of course, will be checking in a lot today and goingfogo going forth. and vati
appointed by benedict the 16th t-as well as pope john paul ii. >> wendy: the current pop was so popular. he had just started using twitter. and he was extremely popular and extremely conservative. >> yes. >> wendy: it just begs to the question of why? 85 is old, but he wasn't sick, you know? >> it was quite interesting. his brother was interviewed, who was an older priest. and the brother indicated there were two specific issues that might have caused this. one is the sense of information that was leaked from his office, as well as, of course, the sex abuse scandal. >> wendy: dr. becker, from regent university, thanks for being with us. >> always a joy. >> george: the u.s. congress is calling on secretary of state john kerry to seek the immediate release of an american pastor imprisoned in iran. pastor saeed abedini is serving eight years in prison because of his christian faith. more than 80 bipartisan members have sent a letter to explore every option. the effort is needed to protect a u.s. citizen from torture and life-threatening punishment. >> wendy: in the african nation of mali, figh
that led back to the vatican as well. a lot of questions about what it would be. john paul ii, thinking about resigning, prepared letters of resignation, and both from 197. he turned 75 and 80, never went ahead with the resignations that he was thinking about. but it will be interesting to hear more as we understand why the pope -- the reasons behind why the pope has been called to resign, which will happen on february 28th. >>> other stories making news this morning. john berman has that too. >>> talking about the storm here. families and businesses in seven counties trying to recover from a violent tornado that tore a path through southern mississippi on sunday. ripping apart homes, shops, and causing damage to a university campus. 4,000 homes are still without power. 16 people are injured. and a storm chaser captured this terrifying sight. a funnel cloud in hattiesburg. that took the brunt of a series of reported twisters that just pounded the region overnight. >>> meanwhile, the northeast beginning dig out of a history-making blizzard. parts of the region, including the hardest hit
to pope john paul ii. he talked to people about how his demise seemed somewhat of a dishonorable end to his papacy. he had in his mind already what type of glorious exit, to use the phrase, he may want in store for him. let's get some perspective as to what is coming out of the vatican as to why this is happening, what it means. john allen, our senior vatican analyst, joins us now. what do we know, john? >> reporter: what we know is that we are living through a day of enormous shock here in rome. not so much the pope benedict xvi chose to resign. he signaled two years ago that he would be open to doing that, but the fact that we had absolutely no indication this was coming today. precisely because of that, therefore, there are some enormous unanswered questions about how all of this is going to play out. i suppose the biggest questions would be, "a," what will the role of a retired pope be? will he continue to play any kind of public role? will he continue to exercise any influence on the future direction of catholicism almost whether he wants to or not? and the second obvious questi
april 2005 who took over for the immensely popular pope john paul ii. his papacy has been marked by controversy. the pope criticized for how he handled the situation in his prior jobs when he was archbishop in germany and later a top vatican official. on a visit to america in 2008, he became the first pope to meet with the victims themselves. on a lighter note, benedict has become known as his personal idiosyncracies like his bright red shoes. he's been using a moveable platform to carry him down the aisle of st. peters basilica. this morning after he made his announcement, he was helped down from his chair. while this is a surprise the pope has said in the past that he reserved the right to resign if he felt too old to perform his duties. what's next? he still hopes to serve the church through a life dedicated to prayer. elizabeth, back to you. >> greg, good morning to you. lot of people really surprised by the announcement this morning. some cardinals in the audience didn't understand what pope benedict was saying? >> that's also true. one of those occasions in rome the pope ac
suffering is meant to respond to that. he's well aware of what john paul ii did, for instance, stay in office until the very end, suffering physically. and in an extreme and public way was legitimate. he's saying, given the situation -- >> and as you look back over his -- >> such that he's -- so far. >> excuse me, father. as you look back over his papacy, what will he will remembered most for? >> i think he'll be remembered, above all, as a teaching pope for his books about the life, his encyclicals. the books about the life of jesus have been profound. it will take years to unpack all of the profundity of his thought. he's done a great service to the church already in his service to john paul ii. >> father john wauck, thank you very much. the first pope to have an account on twitter. >> the first pope ever to tweet. he's 85 years old. pope john paul ii was 84 when he died. wlerned after he died he considered twice resigning because of his ill health. this sets up a political process with the conclave electing the next pope. dan harris joining us on this discussion. it was a quick p
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
eight years ago, and certainly three decades ago when john paul ii was elected. this is a church that is very heavily in latin america. about 42% of catholics are in latin america now. they're growing as well in africa. only 25% in europe, but more than half of the cardinals who will come here to vatican city and who will announce a new pope are from europe. so, here's the big question. will there be a different kind of pope? there are candidates from latin america, some are talking about america's timothy dolan but most talk has been on cardinal from nigeria. we're still waiting to hear exactly when that conclave will take place. >> chris, you were there eight years ago when pope benedict was chosen. now there as he abdicates. chris jansing live in rome. >>> turning to weather, some connecticut residents are still digging out from this weekend's big weekend. hamden they cleared 3 feet of snow. some are upset secondary roads were not plowed but the heavy snowfall overwhelmed city work cruise. the storm is blamed for 18 deaths in the u.s. and canada. speaking of weather, let's go
the new pope to continue that and continue to use worked started by john paul ii. >> i would like a young girl pope coming under than the current one. i would like more forms to get women involved in the church. >> many here believe things have to change, especially to stop the solution catholics from turning their backs on the church. >> for more and are, john, we just heard about the fact that some german catholics are looking for more reform. how is that scene? >> it's a very german phenomenon actually. there is criticism and even hostility toward the catholic church in other countries and far less demands for theological reforms. in upper cook, it is a very on critical atmosphere. >> how likely is it that we will see a non-european? >> it is very suspect. they have not voted along geographic lines. if they had come and the latin americans would not have elected cardinal ratzinger seven years ago. >> western societies seem somewhat removed from the church. where is this going? >> it's a very old institution, isn't it? let me tell you is story. in the beginning of the fifth century, the
. john paul ii had more charisma. >> contra races were coming up -- controversy was coming up. i think he handled them with wisdom. >> the wise are normally the old people. >> time now to return our attention to some other international news. supporters are calling it a revolution, but critics are lashing out at the new eu agreement to cap bonuses. it is aimed at a re-piece of the financial crisis. >> those in favor say it will address public anger about the role played by the banks and the economic meltdown. those against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we
john paul or this pope -- is there any sense of appetite given these issues that are, you no, tearing apart the church in many ways, that there's going to be change. there a mandate for the new pope to do something that will be meaningful and effective? >> well, michael, actually, to be honest, it's not just most it is all of the 115 cardinals who will vote in the conclave who are were appointed by john paul ii or pope benedict xvi. the things like ordination of women in the priesthood, i do not believe it's realistic to think that whoever emerges from the sistine chapel is the next pope of the catholic church is going to overturn church teachings on those points. i do think what is perhaps not only realistic, but quite probable, is that one thing that is very much going to be on the minds of the cardinals who are electing the next pope, whatever else they do, it is critical to make sure whoever they pick has a profile of having clean hands on the crisis, that is, he has to come across as part of the solution to this crisis rather than part of the problem. >> john, thanks so much for
said about humility. when we look at john paul ii's end, many people came away with his public suffering and death as thinking he's teaching us how to die. and now look at this pope. he's teaching us how to be humble. i think it's a beautiful lesson from pope benedict. >> george, it's a complicated question. but in a word as briefly as you can, how do you see pope benedict's legacy? >> he's the pope who completed the work of the second council. with his predecessor gave that council an authoritative representation. they opened the door to the church of the third millennium, or as i've called it angel kal catholicism. benedict xvi will be the last pope to attend vatican two. so we're in an end moment. but he's prepared us well to walk through the door into an evangelical future. >> i want to pursue that catholic evangelicalism. i remember cardinal ratzinger before he became pope talked about making another stab at getting europeans back into the catholic church. making europe a less secular society. did he succeed? or is it just too difficult? >> well, he clearly made it one of
minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. john paul dejoria is here and he is the cofounder of paul mitchell systems. he is joining us now from austin, texas. ten dollars an hour. you say yes to that. >> yes. let me explain how. people are talking about increasing wages. for the employer, many employers, they are saying i am raising my payroll 25%. same productivity. i cannot afford it. a lot of people are thinking that way. how do you increase productivity and be able to pay people more money? that is the secret. if somebody is hired, for example, $7.25, whatever they are hard for, you work with them. in three to four months, it is the ramp-up period of time. we will learn the job and how to create sub productivity of what we are doing. our business can have at least 25% more income because we are increasing productivity. if we do end up to 30%, how about $10 an hour. human beings are capable of doing a heck of a lot more. dagen: you are talking about a decision made by the business owner and operator. a private decision. not one mandated by the government. if the government did move it up , if you
remember how pope john paul ii was so young when he was elected. i think he was 56 or 57. a young man. >> he used to go skiing all the time. >> he was elected when he was 78 years old. >> yeah. so we watched him turn into an elderly man that was very frail. remember how long it took, we waited and waited. i can remember i was on a plane when he finally passed. but he didn't -- i mean, he was not healthy at the end and he didn't resign. so that's what i don't really understand, ross, right? >> well, traditionally, they haven't resigned. so -- >> 1415, yeah. >> so he's 2005, he's 86. so that's five, six, seven, eight -- >> i think what we're all dancing around the issue of whether or not there's more to it, right? is that what we're getting at? >> is there something else we don't know about. >> all of them have gotten elderly and they have essentially died in office and that's when they begin to look for a new pope. that is no happening in this case. >> right. you said it would be pure speculation. it's probably best not to specula speculate, at least you filled us in that at this point
time we've seen a pope retire, we came familiar with the process after the death of pope john paul ii. white smoke coming 24 hours after the voting began signaling the start of pope benedict's eight years heading the church. today we went down where it all happened down in vatican city. >> as of february 28 the papal apartment will be vacant and as the rules dictate, they will have 15-20 days to bring all the cardinals around the world here, under the age of 80. they will lock themselves in the sistine chapel and begin the process. there will be secret ballots, after each ballot paper slips will be burned. white smoke will arise when they have news of great joy. >> we have a pope. that announcement will come right there from the balcony just as it did in this very spot eight years ago. >> shep: we don't know when it will happen but we'll get a better idea tomorrow. changing the face of catholicism for many years to come. with us is joan lewis, she worked at the vatican for information services 34 years. >> in rome. >> shep: you never saw? >> i never thought i would be here 27 years an
choice is experiencing and bring those numbers back up? >> it's a very good question, both john paul ii and benedict xvi spent enormous energies trying to reevangelize europe. and the effects have been minute natural so far. one has to hope that europe facing a very bleak demographic future itself, i mean europe is depopulating itself at a rate unheard of in human history. will eventually suggest to europeans that the sole wiltering secularism in which they have been stuing themselves for the past several generations has no future quite literally. it would be very helpful if the next pope is a man who had come from a background who has faced down and successfully met the challenge of aggressive seg larism. >> merge catholicism is experiencing something of an identity crisis, catholics now have twice voted for a president who one might consider to be the most liberal on right to life issues that we have ever had. is that catholic identity crisis in the united states of kern to the vatican? >> it should be of concern to everyone, although i would underscore that catholics who are regularl
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
, at the beginning of the papacy of john paul ii. one of of the reasons it's in a better place today is because of pope benedict. who as cardinal ratzinger, he didn't get it at the beginning, but he listened and he learned and he pushed and he threw hundreds of priests out -- bad priests out of the priesthood. so the church is in a much better position today. mostly due to pope benedict than it was in the past. >> yeah, a lot of -- great to get your thoughts. a lot of people, of course, would disagree and still a lot of angst and a lot of people who say that the pontiff was stymied at attempts for reform. we will see what happens the next time around. we do appreciate your thoughts. reverend thomas reese, jesuit priest. thanks for your time today. >>> the last week and a half we have heard blt murder allegations against oscar pistorius, but he is not the only family member who's now in trouble. >> carl pistorius is facing homicide charges. all about a traffic accident. we'll have that story coming up. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealma
at the time of pope john paul ii's ilniz. and i think it's much more important to have a vital individual there to carry on as pope, so i think the pope made what i think will now be a precedent-setting decision. >> i think there's no doubt in that. with the advances in medical technology, if they could continue to essentially live out their lives as pope. so somebody we'll be discussing in the coming days. i want to switch gears and talk about the state of the union. glen rush from politico writing that it will be less of a olive branch. if that's the strategy, what do you think of it? do you think it's the time what most americans seen -- the time is right for the president to push hard? >> well, you know, they always ask the question, the state of the union is, fill in the blank. i think the state of the union is strong, but the state of economy is weak. we have too many people looking for jobs and too many people who have given up looking for jobs. he never menned -- so let's get together, put people back to work. he can approve the pipeline and the other is to approve free trade with
when pope john paul died he was 85 years old. the current pope is 85 as well and if you reach a certain age and you cannot function. you should step down and give way to younger people. no american has ever been picked as polk. why no mechanism to this code?. it is unlikely to happen here because it would give too much power the united states. that history is shown us he believes the cardinals will look some roast. that broke saturday. the red cross is helping 22 people find shelter after a deadly fire on treasure island. this apartment caught fire around 12:30 saturday morning. five people escaped one of the units, but not this little girl. seen here in a blue tank top, 10-year-old corn-lina godfrey died in the fire. neighbors whose apartments burned say their loss is not comparable to the girl's family. >> "the story really speaks for itself.it's horrible." it took firefighters nearly two hours to get the flames investigators are still trying to determine the cause. in the meantime, the red cross is working with catholic charities on new housing for the displaced residents. >> oppone
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
-perpetuating leadership. virtually all these cardinals who are picked either by pope benedict or by pope john paul, i believe, somebody correct me if i'm wrong, the average age is somewhere in the 70s, low 70s. there aren't if to really drive your metaphor into the ground, a lot of blue state sort of cardinals in that list, and so there are not a lot of obviously progressive candidates on the list of potential popes. i don't think progressive conservative, however, is the right optic. i think the real question is when you get someone elected who actually is open to change and dialogue on some of these issues, on the all male celibate priesthood, if not on women priests. birth control is kind of a separate issue. the church ares until this contraception fight over the obama plan, really hasn't preached very much about it. it's not only the faithful who let it go. it's really the church itself who sort of accept that. there just aren't a lot of catholic families of 12 kids anymore in most of the west, and increasingly, not in the third world either. >> e.j., i want to bring in our panel here in new yor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)